Tag Archives: yosemite

Yosemite trip – Heaven on Earth

18 Jun

Next summer’s epic hike will bring us back to the valley here, but there really won’t be a chance to see everything. So what’s one to do? Make two trips!

Mid may and the melt was in full force so all the falls were at peak flow. If nature is your thing then Yosemite needs to be on your bucket list.

I’ll post some more later as I get around to it – this is just what I pulled off my GoPro this morning.

These are in the order they were taken. It kinda goes from “Oh, that’s cool” to “Ooooooh, holy crap.”

First real view of the valley:

El Capitan under clouds. There’s really no sense of scale here because everything is so massive, but here’s an idea – this wall is is 3,000 ft tall.

Bridalveil Fall

Merced River

El Cap minus the clouds

Cathedral Beach

800 miles in 4 days in a Challenger R/T

View of Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge

Midday drinks at The Ahwahnee

Merced River

Upper and Lower Yosemite Falls (2,425 ft) – this is the 6th tallest waterfall in the world and the tallest in North America.

Lower Yosemite Fall (320 ft)- there are people on the rocks for scale

View of the eastern part of the valley from Glacier Point -Half Dome, Nevada Fall, and Vernal Fall out there

Western part of the valley from Glacier Point – that’s Yosemite Falls in the middle

Sequoias in the Mariposa Grove

And finally “Tunnel View.” Probably the most recognizable visual from the park

Yosemite Range of Light

25 Apr

Beautiful.

Yosemite Range of Light from Shawn Reeder on Vimeo.

Horsetail Falls on Fire

21 Feb

 

http://articles.boston.com/2012-02-19/news/31077597_1_photographers-yosemite-fall-el-capitan

Every February Yosemite waterfall turns to lava

February 19, 2012|Tracie Cone, Associated Press
 
A window of time just opened in Yosemite National Park when nature photographers wait, as if for an eclipse, until the moment when the sun and earth align to create a fleeting phenomenon.This marvel of celestial configuration happens in a flash at sunset in mid-February — if the winter weather cooperates. On those days the setting sun illuminates one of the park’s lesser-known waterfalls so precisely that it resembles molten lava as it flows over the sheer granite face of the imposing El Capitan.

Every year growing numbers of photographers converge on the park, their necks craned toward the ephemeral Horsetail Fall, hoping the sky will be clear so they can duplicate the spectacle first recorded in color in 1973 by the late renowned outdoors photographer Galen Rowell.

“Horsetail is so uniquely situated that I don’t know of any other waterfall on earth that gets that kind of light,’’ said Michael Frye, who wrote the book “The Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite.’’

“How many are perched on a high open cliff? Most are in an alcove or canyon and won’t get the sun setting behind it. Yosemite’s special geography makes this fall distinctive,’’ he said.

Four decades ago, photographers had only to point and shoot to capture another famous Yosemite firefall — a man-made cascade of embers pushed from a bonfire on summer nights from Glacier Point.

But photographing Horsetail is a lesson in astronomy, physics and geometry as hopefuls consider the azimuth degrees and minutes of the earth’s orbit relative to the sun to determine the optimal day to experience it. They are looking for the lowest angle of light that will paint Horsetail the colors of an iridescent sunset as rays reflect off granite behind the water. It materializes in varying degrees of intensity for the same two weeks every year.

“If you hit it at just the right time, it turns this amazing color of gold or red-orange,’’ said Frye, a photo instructor with the Ansel Adams Gallery in the park.

Adams photographed the fall, but his iconic black and white images do not capture its fiery quality, and it’s unclear whether he ever noted it.

To be successful in photographing the watery firefall, it takes luck and timing, and the cooperation of nature. Horsetail Fall drains a small area on the eastern summit of El Capitan and flows only in the winter and spring in years with adequate rain and snow, which is scarce this year. Experts say it doesn’t take a lot of water for the fall to light up.

Most important, the southwestern horizon must be clear, and February is the time of year when storm clouds often obscure the setting sun.

When conditions come together, the scrawny Horsetail Fall is the shining star of a park famed for its other waterfalls — raging Yosemite Fall and Bridalveil Fall. But Horsetail is the longest free-falling one, with a drop of 1,500 feet before it hits granite and spills another 500.

The fire lights up around dusk and lasts for about two minutes. The best views are east of El Capitan along the main roads into and out of Yosemite Valley. Most photographers gather at the El Capitan picnic area, a small pullout marked only by a sign with a table etched on it. But park officials say the inexperienced can look for the hordes of tripods and cameras to find a vantage point.

 Recent storms and snowfall mean the finicky fall is flowing again, and park officials are hopeful it will last through February 24, which is generally the last day of the year it can be seen. Once an obscure event, park officials say that Internet discussions have made it more popular in recent years.

The popularity is reminiscent of an actual fiery fall that entertained guests in the park from 1930 to 1968. Each summer evening as the sun set, employees of the park concessionaire would build a huge red fir bark fire atop Glacier Point. At 9 p.m., as the fire burned down to embers and the Indian Love Song waned, someone would yell, “Let the fire fall!’’

With long rakes men pushed glowing coals over the 3,200-foot cliff.

Had visitors looked in the opposite direction at a different time of year they would have seen the watery fire-fall of nature.

“There’s no comparison, and I’ve seen both,’’ said park spokesman Scott Gediman. “The natural activities and occurrences in Yosemite are far more amazing and more valuable than the human-made ones — everything from a sunset to wildlife to rainbows at Vernal Fall. There are a lot of amazing things, and they’re here year after year.’’

 

Need to focus? Here’s a tree.

17 Nov

 

“In God’s wilderness lies the hope of the world – the great fresh, unblighted, unredeemed wilderness. The galling harness of civilization drops off, and the wounds heal ere we are aware.”
John Muir

 

It’s November 17… National Take a Hike Day.

 

Taking  break from your day to watch these won’t kill you. In fact, it might make the day a little easier.

“A 2008 study by University of Michigan psychologists found that walking outside or even just looking at pictures of natural settings improved directed attention, the ability to concentrate on a task. Put another way: nature restores our ability to focus.” 

– Outside Magazine, Dec 2011

 

 

Landscapes: Volume Two from Dustin Farrell on Vimeo.

Time Lapse Tour of Yosemite National Park from Henry Jun Wah Lee on Vimeo.

Landscapes: Volume One from Dustin Farrell on Vimeo.

Timescapes Timelapse: Mountain Light from Tom Lowe on Vimeo.

On Assignment with Jimmy Chin – Yosemite

22 Aug

I feel like i’ve posted a lot of climibng vids. Truth be told I’m not a climber. I did some indoor stuff in college but not having someone I COMPLETELY trusted belaying me made me always have doubts and fears in the back of my mind… to the point that I stopped. Maybe one day I’ll give it another shot.

The reason for the vids isn’t necessarily the climbing aspect though. It’s the beauty. The scenery. Nature.

We go eastward to realize history and study the works of art and literature, retracing the steps of the race; we go westward as into the future, with a spirit of enterprise and adventure.

-Henry David Thoreau

Alone on the Wall : Free-solo climbing with Alex Honnold

16 Apr

No words really. The dude’s an animal. There’s an article about him in this month’s issue of Outside… I read it on the plane yesterday and it blew my mind.

Article here: No Strings Attached
“At 25, climber Alex Honnold is already the undisputed master of the most dangerous sport around—scaling iconic rock walls without any ropes. Is he the next great thing in modern climbing? Or a suicide mission in sticky shoes?”

Alex Honnold makes the first free solos of the largest walls in North America. He scales 2,000 feet with only shoes and chalk bag—no rope, no safety, and no room for error. Though he’s a superhero on the walls, off the rock Alex is a shy, self-effacing young guy living in his van. He’s sort of a Clark Kent-Superman character.

This first link won’t embed, but you NEED to click it:

http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/adventure/featured-videos-adventure/adv-beyond-the-edge-honnold.html

In the realm of free solo climbing – climbing peaks without ropes – Alex Honnold is the best in the world. Honnold, a bumbling and slightly geeky kid becomes a poised, graceful and calculated climber able to complete the hardest free solos. With his sights set on Yosemite’s iconic 600-metre Half Dome wall, Alex first travels to Utah to conquer the 370-metre Moonlight Buttress. It takes all of his mental efforts to focus on the climb, with 300-metres of air – and no rope – beneath him. Honnold has developed his own mental armour to protect him from thinking too much while climbing, but when he’s standing on a sliver of a ledge 550 metres above Yosemite’s Half Dome wall, his armour runs thin. To Honnold, doubt is the biggest danger and he experiences a feeling of dread like never before. Pulling himself together, Alex completes the 600-metre climb – something that can take other climbers days to complete – in under 3 hours cementing his place in free soloing history.

http://natgeoadventure.tv/int/post.aspx?id=24672
http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/adventure/adventure-featured/adv-beyond-the-edge-honnold.html

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