Tag Archives: waterfall

Yosemite trip – Heaven on Earth

18 Jun

Next summer’s epic hike will bring us back to the valley here, but there really won’t be a chance to see everything. So what’s one to do? Make two trips!

Mid may and the melt was in full force so all the falls were at peak flow. If nature is your thing then Yosemite needs to be on your bucket list.

I’ll post some more later as I get around to it – this is just what I pulled off my GoPro this morning.

These are in the order they were taken. It kinda goes from “Oh, that’s cool” to “Ooooooh, holy crap.”

First real view of the valley:

El Capitan under clouds. There’s really no sense of scale here because everything is so massive, but here’s an idea – this wall is is 3,000 ft tall.

Bridalveil Fall

Merced River

El Cap minus the clouds

Cathedral Beach

800 miles in 4 days in a Challenger R/T

View of Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge

Midday drinks at The Ahwahnee

Merced River

Upper and Lower Yosemite Falls (2,425 ft) – this is the 6th tallest waterfall in the world and the tallest in North America.

Lower Yosemite Fall (320 ft)- there are people on the rocks for scale

View of the eastern part of the valley from Glacier Point -Half Dome, Nevada Fall, and Vernal Fall out there

Western part of the valley from Glacier Point – that’s Yosemite Falls in the middle

Sequoias in the Mariposa Grove

And finally “Tunnel View.” Probably the most recognizable visual from the park

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Horsetail Falls on Fire

21 Feb

 

http://articles.boston.com/2012-02-19/news/31077597_1_photographers-yosemite-fall-el-capitan

Every February Yosemite waterfall turns to lava

February 19, 2012|Tracie Cone, Associated Press
 
A window of time just opened in Yosemite National Park when nature photographers wait, as if for an eclipse, until the moment when the sun and earth align to create a fleeting phenomenon.This marvel of celestial configuration happens in a flash at sunset in mid-February — if the winter weather cooperates. On those days the setting sun illuminates one of the park’s lesser-known waterfalls so precisely that it resembles molten lava as it flows over the sheer granite face of the imposing El Capitan.

Every year growing numbers of photographers converge on the park, their necks craned toward the ephemeral Horsetail Fall, hoping the sky will be clear so they can duplicate the spectacle first recorded in color in 1973 by the late renowned outdoors photographer Galen Rowell.

“Horsetail is so uniquely situated that I don’t know of any other waterfall on earth that gets that kind of light,’’ said Michael Frye, who wrote the book “The Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite.’’

“How many are perched on a high open cliff? Most are in an alcove or canyon and won’t get the sun setting behind it. Yosemite’s special geography makes this fall distinctive,’’ he said.

Four decades ago, photographers had only to point and shoot to capture another famous Yosemite firefall — a man-made cascade of embers pushed from a bonfire on summer nights from Glacier Point.

But photographing Horsetail is a lesson in astronomy, physics and geometry as hopefuls consider the azimuth degrees and minutes of the earth’s orbit relative to the sun to determine the optimal day to experience it. They are looking for the lowest angle of light that will paint Horsetail the colors of an iridescent sunset as rays reflect off granite behind the water. It materializes in varying degrees of intensity for the same two weeks every year.

“If you hit it at just the right time, it turns this amazing color of gold or red-orange,’’ said Frye, a photo instructor with the Ansel Adams Gallery in the park.

Adams photographed the fall, but his iconic black and white images do not capture its fiery quality, and it’s unclear whether he ever noted it.

To be successful in photographing the watery firefall, it takes luck and timing, and the cooperation of nature. Horsetail Fall drains a small area on the eastern summit of El Capitan and flows only in the winter and spring in years with adequate rain and snow, which is scarce this year. Experts say it doesn’t take a lot of water for the fall to light up.

Most important, the southwestern horizon must be clear, and February is the time of year when storm clouds often obscure the setting sun.

When conditions come together, the scrawny Horsetail Fall is the shining star of a park famed for its other waterfalls — raging Yosemite Fall and Bridalveil Fall. But Horsetail is the longest free-falling one, with a drop of 1,500 feet before it hits granite and spills another 500.

The fire lights up around dusk and lasts for about two minutes. The best views are east of El Capitan along the main roads into and out of Yosemite Valley. Most photographers gather at the El Capitan picnic area, a small pullout marked only by a sign with a table etched on it. But park officials say the inexperienced can look for the hordes of tripods and cameras to find a vantage point.

 Recent storms and snowfall mean the finicky fall is flowing again, and park officials are hopeful it will last through February 24, which is generally the last day of the year it can be seen. Once an obscure event, park officials say that Internet discussions have made it more popular in recent years.

The popularity is reminiscent of an actual fiery fall that entertained guests in the park from 1930 to 1968. Each summer evening as the sun set, employees of the park concessionaire would build a huge red fir bark fire atop Glacier Point. At 9 p.m., as the fire burned down to embers and the Indian Love Song waned, someone would yell, “Let the fire fall!’’

With long rakes men pushed glowing coals over the 3,200-foot cliff.

Had visitors looked in the opposite direction at a different time of year they would have seen the watery fire-fall of nature.

“There’s no comparison, and I’ve seen both,’’ said park spokesman Scott Gediman. “The natural activities and occurrences in Yosemite are far more amazing and more valuable than the human-made ones — everything from a sunset to wildlife to rainbows at Vernal Fall. There are a lot of amazing things, and they’re here year after year.’’

 

Best POV wipeouts and OMG moments

31 Jan

Reposting from Outside: http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/video/Watch-This.html

 

The 6 craziest POV wipeouts

 

Running a 90-Foot Waterfall

Noccalula Falls Full Edit

Noccalula Falls Full Edit w/ POV from Isaac Levinson on Vimeo.

 Money Comment: “That is a huge brown stout.”
Star:
Pat Keller, 25, of Maggie Valley, North Carolina
There’s just something about the power of a flooded river flowing off a 90-foot waterfall—people can’t look away. I certainly couldn’t when I showed up at Gadsen, Alabama, at 2:30 in the afternoon with two other kayakers and a videographer. I went first, following a jet of current at the center of the waterfall. When I started falling, I leaned forward, dropped my paddle, and plunged into the pool at the bottom. It couldn’t have gone better. My two buddies followed, and we ended up with this footage, which looks straight down at a torrent of water falling, then chases it. Watch it and, even if you’re a nonkayaker, you’ll get how huge that drop really is. I’m hoping the big fish, like beer and energy-drink companies, see it. Maybe they’ll even give us some money.

 

 

Backcountry Ski Wipeout

Tuckerman Ravine Crash

Money Comment: “That’s me in the video! The fall was absolutely insane. I thought I was about to die.”
Cameraman: Dustin O’Brien, 25, of Marshfield, Massachusetts
My buddy and I were hiking Tuckerman Ravine, New Hampshire’s most popular backcountry ski area, on an April afternoon. About three-quarters of the way up, we were hiking up a chute when snow started sloughing down from the summit. I pulled out my camera to film it when this girl flies through the frame, sliding face-first down the hill and yelling, “Oh, my God!” She must have been going 35 mph. It’s funny, the entire day I shot 70 seconds of video, and that moment is what came of it.

 

 

 

Trapped by an Avalanche

Avalanche Burial With Black Diamond Avalung

 

Money Comment: “He didn’t even use the avalung. Way to go Black Diamond.”
Opportunist:
Adam Chamberlain, 38, vice president of marketing for Black Diamond, Salt Lake City
In the spring of 2008, a backcountry skier approached us with footage of one of our products in action. It started with a head-cam shot of a guy skiing epic powder in Alaska. Then the snow fractured beneath his skis. He was buried in the avalanche for almost five minutes before his friends rescued him. We’d never seen an avalanche video like it, and one of the reasons he survived was that he was wearing one of our backcountry safety devices. We paid a grand for the video, branded it, and posted it to Black Diamond’s website, where it went viral. A year later, people started posting comments disputing whether the avalung saved his life. He was wearing one. I think people just found it offensive that we had taken an organic gear testimonial and used it for marketing purposes.

 

 

 

Crash-Landing in the Himalayas

Paragliding vs. Eagle

 

Money Comment: “Angry birds!”
Star:
Vladimir Tsarkov, 25, of Moscow
Last October, I went to Bir-Billing Valley in India for a month of paragliding. On my first flight, I was 850 feet above the northern Himalayas when two birds that looked like eagles popped up in front of me. Birds rarely hit paragliders, so I decided to stay my course. Big mistake. One got snagged in the lines of my glider, and the entire cupola collapsed. I fell at 23 feet per second for a minute and a half and landed in a shrub. Somehow I was totally fine, just cussing up a storm. I had to calm down before facing the bird, which was still caught in the chute. It flew off as soon as I untangled it. I sent the video from my helmet cam to a friend in Moscow, and she uploaded it to YouTube. All the Russian channels put it on their broadcasts. I was still in India and hadn’t talked to my parents yet; they freaked out when they watched the news.

 

 

 

Winter Climbing Gone Bad

Mixed Climbing Avalanche Accident

 

Money Comment: “Potent reminder that surviving the fall is only the start of your troubles in alpine climbing. Heal fast.”
Cameraman:
Ed Warren, 26, of West Lebanon, New Hampshire
After 25 minutes anchored to ice screws, I turned off my GoPro. Belaying makes boring video, even when you’re 450 feet up a 70-degree slope. My partner, Brice, was a rope length above me, chopping through snow slabs that blocked the chute we’d been climbing in Wyoming’s Snowy Range since 8 a.m. Brice triggered the avalanche and fell with it for almost 200 feet before the rope caught him. When it hit me, the snow was going 70 mph and knocked me off the wall. After it stopped, Brice was fine, but I was hanging upside down with a crampon pressed into the flesh of my shattered ankle. I was shocked to be alive. I instinctively turned my helmet cam back on as soon as I righted myself, rappelled down the cliff, and then crawled two miles back to the car, filming the whole way.

 

 

 

Biker vs. Antelope

Mountain Biker Gets Taken Out by Buck

 

Money Comment: “Dayum nature, you scary!”
Star:
Evan van der Spuy, 18, of Port Shepstone, South Africa
I was in a mountain-bike race in Albert Falls Game Reserve, South Africa, riding 22 miles per hour down a stretch of singletrack when, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a 300-pound red hartebeest—a giant antelope—charging at me. I think he was as scared as I was, because neither of us could hit the brakes. The thing T-boned me, horns to helmet. I got knocked out cold and woke up with a stiff neck, four chipped teeth, and absolutely no idea what had happened. We posted the video on YouTube the following day, and for the next 72 hours my phone rang nonstop while more than 400 media outlets hounded me for interviews.

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