Tag Archives: pics

Red Bull and Caterham (F1) give their V8s one last blast – rev limiters removed

27 Nov

As they prep to switch to the turbo V6 next year a fitting sendoff was necessary for the Renault RS27 after the Brazillian GP…
The removed the rev limiters and let ’em rip. Supposedly Red Bull hit 22,000 RPM

Sebastian Vettel and Mark Webber helped Red Bull and Renault to send off their final V8 engine with one last blast.

Webber personally fired up the Renault RS27 in his chassis, glowed white hot as it screamed away at maximum revs with its limiter disabled.

Lotus and Caterham added to the cacophony of noise in the pit lane after the Brazilian Grand Prix as Formula One said goodbye to the V8 engine formula which has been in service since the 2006 season.

 

Red Bull:

 

Caterham:

 

 

 

Fun facts about the Renault RS27:

  • 2.4 L V8 (2006 to 2013)
  • 8 years of competition
  • 59 wins – 40% of wins in the V8 era
  • 65 pole positions
  • 55 fastest laps
  • 3665.5 points
  • 5 Constructors’ world titles
  • 5 Drivers’ world titles
  • 750 bhp maximum power (2013 version, typical car installation, typical temp/pressure/humidity)
  • 18,000 rpm maximum engine speed (2013 version)
  • 95kg weight, FIA perimeter
  • 1,271 engines built, 683 for track use, 588 for dyno use
  • more than 2 000 000 km total
  • more than 5 000 components per engine
  • more than 7 600 000 parts used
  • 21,800 pistons used
  • 43,200 inlet valves used
  • 45,900 exhaust valves used
  • 43,800 connecting-rod bolts fitted
  • 22,000 spark plugs used
  • 10,600 oil filters used

 

Jean-Michel Jalinier, Renault Sport F1 President and Managing Director: “The V8 era has been a particularly successful one for Renault, and one that stands up to the exceptionally high standards we set with the V10 in the 90s. We can be very proud of the ‘hit’ rate of wins and poles, but equally of the progress we have made, particularly under the frozen engine regulations. What is equally satisfying is the relationships we have built up with all of our teams. We have worked hard on installation to provide the most driveable engine, sacrificing outright power to enable greater integration and other benefits such as energy recovery and cooling to make the overall speed of the car quicker. To have won with four different teams and six different drivers shows the relationships have flourished.”

22 Absolutely Essential Diagrams You Need For Camping

12 Nov

http://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/absolutely-essential-diagrams-you-need-for-camping

22 Absolutely Essential Diagrams You Need For Camping

From survival to s’mores, here’s everything you need to know to ensure a flawless camping trip. posted on June 17, 2013 at 2:27pm EDT

1. How to Build a Campfire

How to Build a Campfire

2. Tent Tips

Tent Tips

3. Everything You Need to Know About the Technicality of S’mores

Everything You Need to Know About the Technicality of S'mores

4. How to Estimate Remaining Daylight with Your Hand

How to Estimate Remaining Daylight with Your Hand

5. Snacks to Pack

Snacks to Pack

6. What You Can Do to Repel Mosquitoes

What You Can Do to Repel Mosquitoes

7. How to Sleep Warm

How to Sleep Warm

8. How to Survive Hypothermia

How to Survive Hypothermia

9. Backpacker’s Checklist

Backpacker's Checklist

10. How to Rig a Tarp

How to Rig a Tarp

11. How to Get Your Dutch Oven to the Right Temperature

How to Get Your Dutch Oven to the Right Temperature

You can very easily adapt recipes you can make in a kitchen oven to an outdoor dutch oven.

12. How to Identify Animal Tracks

How to Identify Animal Tracks

13. Know Your Stargazing Events This Summer

Know Your Stargazing Events This Summer

14. 10 Easy Fire Starters

10 Easy Fire Starters

15. Kayak Camping Checklist

Kayak Camping Checklist

16. A Guide to Hammock Camping

A Guide to Hammock Camping

17. Guide to Spider Bites

Guide to Spider Bites

18. Checklist for Car Camping

Checklist for Car Camping

19. How to Make Shelters in Survival Situations Using Nature

How to Make Shelters in Survival Situations Using Nature

20. How to React to a Wildlife Encounter

How to React to a Wildlife Encounter

21. Tarp Tips

Tarp Tips

22. Know Your Poisonous Plants

Know Your Poisonous Plants

The golden age of auto racing

11 Oct

Scuderia Ferrari Factory

Lancia-Ferrari D50 in preparation for 1956 Monaco Grand Prix

Yosemite trip – Heaven on Earth

18 Jun

Next summer’s epic hike will bring us back to the valley here, but there really won’t be a chance to see everything. So what’s one to do? Make two trips!

Mid may and the melt was in full force so all the falls were at peak flow. If nature is your thing then Yosemite needs to be on your bucket list.

I’ll post some more later as I get around to it – this is just what I pulled off my GoPro this morning.

These are in the order they were taken. It kinda goes from “Oh, that’s cool” to “Ooooooh, holy crap.”

First real view of the valley:

El Capitan under clouds. There’s really no sense of scale here because everything is so massive, but here’s an idea – this wall is is 3,000 ft tall.

Bridalveil Fall

Merced River

El Cap minus the clouds

Cathedral Beach

800 miles in 4 days in a Challenger R/T

View of Yosemite Falls from Swinging Bridge

Midday drinks at The Ahwahnee

Merced River

Upper and Lower Yosemite Falls (2,425 ft) – this is the 6th tallest waterfall in the world and the tallest in North America.

Lower Yosemite Fall (320 ft)- there are people on the rocks for scale

View of the eastern part of the valley from Glacier Point -Half Dome, Nevada Fall, and Vernal Fall out there

Western part of the valley from Glacier Point – that’s Yosemite Falls in the middle

Sequoias in the Mariposa Grove

And finally “Tunnel View.” Probably the most recognizable visual from the park

FOR SALE: 800 mph jet powered land speed racer

2 May

When those quarterly bonus checks roll in don’t forget to treat yourself to something fun this time.

The car was built by Craig Breedlove, run to 675 back in the ’90s, then sold to Steve Fossett.

When Fossett died in that plane crash in ’07 the project was abandoned. Their loss is your gain! They are accepting offers >$3MM.

Tell Andy Green to fuck off and bring that record back to the US where it belongs!

“buyer gets the entire workshop, drawings, spares, tools, jigs and even the truck needed to haul Target 800 MPH to the dry lake bed of your choice.”

 

No joke. It’s actually for sale: http://www.project100.com/Land%20Speed%20Record/Fossett%20Absolute%20LSR%20car%20for%20sale.pdf

 

 

Developed from landspeed legend Craig Breedlove’s promising 1996-1997 ‘Spirit of America – Sonic Arrow’ by the late Steve Fossett’s Reno, Nevada-based team during 2006-2007. Fossett purchased the un-fulfilled project in July, 2006 from Breedlove with an initial record target speed of 800 mph, with eventual development planned for speeds of 900 mph+. The ‘Target 800 mph’ team was nearing testing phase at Bonneville, Utah or the dry lakes of California when Steve was killed in the crash of his light aircraft in September, 2007.

Initial record runs were planned for a dry lake in northern Nevada in spring, 2008. A logistical exercise for loading, transport, assembly etc was conducted by the team o n the Black Rock Desert in October, 2007. That is the source of the attached photos (all images © Stuart Radnofsky / Project 100 – 2007). Further engine tests / team exercises were conducted in early 2008 at El Mirage before the project was eventually shut down, with all elements carefully packed and mothballed in mid-2008.

The car has been rebuilt and re-wired from the ground up with a longer wheelbase, wider track and modified aerodynamics, including lengthened wheel covers and parachute assembly and no dorsal fin. The braking parachute and its deployment system were also completely re-designed

FOR SALE
We are selling the complete project outright. Included in the sale will be the car plus all designs and drawings, data and other documentation, all workshop and operations elements, including special tools and jigs, extensive spares, custom loading and assembly hardware, modified race transporter trailer and tractor, catering transporter and tractor, pickup truck and more.

Over US$ 4 million is invested in this project. Serious offers (principals only) are invited

Contact Stuart Radnofsky, Director, Project 100 Communications Ltd, Tel +44 (0)1727 836238, Fax +44 (0)1727 869142, E-mail info@project100.com

THE CAR
Powered by a single modified S&S LM1500 (a ‘land / marine’ powerplant derived from the famed General Electric J-79 turbojet as used in the USAF Phantom II fighter-bomber) the engine generates over 18,400 lbs of supersonic thrust with afterburner and water injection. The car is constructed of steel tubing with stressed aluminum skin, the driver compartment being made of carbon/Kevlar/glass fiber composite.

Although at first glance a tricycle layout, the car actually runs on 4 wheels, the front pair closely situated to allow a smaller frontal area and thus reducing drag, the rear pair on a wide track for stability. Primary deceleration is, naturally, by parachute, with a ‘friction ski’ brake for final stopping power.

Overall length is 48 ft (14.63 m); overall width 10 ft 6 inches (3.20 m).
Overall weight (wet) is just over 9,000 lbs, achieving a thrust to weight ratio better than any modern jet fighter.

ENGINE: S&S LM-1500 / J-79

  • Supplied by: S&S Turbine Services Ltd
  • Fuel Capacity: 105.0 gallons
  • Thrust: 18,400 lb (36,800 hp) with afterburner and water injection
  • Oil capacity: 2.5 gallons

CONSTRUCTION

  • Steel tube frame with stressed aluminum skin
  • Carbon / Kevlar / Glass fiber composite driver capsule, engine inlets, and rear wheel fairings
  • Tires: Filament-wound carbon/glass composite material with rubberized epoxy matrix
  • Wheels: Aluminum billet hub, special alloy spun disk heat treated, steel fastened
  • Wheel bearings: Tapered rollers
  • Suspension / front: coil over hydraulic shocks
  • Suspension / rear: variable deflection beam
  • Steering: worm and sector
  • Parachutes: mortar deployed, supersonic capable
  • Windshield: Lexan
  • Electrical Power: deep cycle batteries, 28V system

POTENTIAL

The data below was logged from one of Craig Breedlove’s actual 1996 runs reaching 675 mph. Extrapolations from this data project a potential top speed of 850-900 mph.

Hike pictures – Caprock Canyons Trailway (TX)

11 Mar

The Caprock Canyons Trailway is a 60 mile rail line that was dismantled and turned into a hiking trail. This is a 22 mile stretch from Quitaque, TX to South Plains, TX

 

“In September 2011, 80 descendants of the great southern plains bison herd were released to roam 700 acres of grasslands in the park”

 

The hike starts on top of the Caprock.

 

Random piles of railroad debris

 

The Valley of Tears
” According to legend, the name of the valley was suggested by some unknown person who heard the wailing of mothers and children who had been kidnapped by Indians and brought there in the mid-1800s to be separated from each other and sold”

 

Camp for the night was at the 10 mile point at the entrance to Clarity Tunnel. We got to watch bats fly all night and being surrounded by three canyon walls it was completely dark at night. The number of stars visible was completely insane.

 

Breakfast… there was bourbon and rain.

 

Heading through the tunnel in the morning

 

And this is the view we walked into on the other side. Completely different than where we came from.

 

Trundling is the practice of rolling large rocks or boulders down hillsides. It is discouraged in many areas, for reasons of safety and environmental impact. Its practice can be traced back to rock climbers in the 18th century in North America.”


 

Foot care stop. The original plan was to do 10 miles on flat ground the first day, hit the tunnel, camp, do another 8 the next day, then finish with a final short 4 mile trip the third morning. After the blisters started becoming a bitch and we realized we were making pretty good time we decided to power through and kill the last 12 miles in one day.

 

Coaxing Slider back from the edge with more bourbon

 

But the last few miles were back on top of the Caprock in the west TX wind. Fucking miserable.

And the first stop when we got back to FTW… a bar.

COTA pics – Rolex Series GrandAm race this weekend

4 Mar

Woke up at 530am
715am flight to Austin
Head to friend’s hotel to pickup my ticket from the concierge.
At the track by 9am
Get windburned and freeze my ass off all day.
On a plane headed back home at 640pm.

All in all not a bad day

Oh, and this trip reinforced my odd obsession with Aston Martin’s. The Vantages running GS are in my top 3 for best sounding racecar ever. Lots of these on track pics will be of the Vantages.

Main straight – These seats suck.

Turn 1 – Phil Hill

Straight coming out of Turn 2

Turn 3 going into the S section

Turn 4

Turn 12 at the end of the back straight – These are the section 15 seats. IMO the best in the house. You get to see the second half of the straight, turns 12 -15 (and the turn in of 16) and there’s a board right there so we were watching the live SpeedTV coverage at the same time

Turn 15

 

 

Anyway, on to the car pics.

And finally, the Vantage GS class cars

Also, if anyone is buying early Christmas presents I’ll take this Juan Manuel Fangio painting. Please and thank you.

 

Ready for summer to be over

2 Sep

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

-Robert Frost

Captain America at the Tour of California

18 May

 

American Dave Zabriskie of the Garmin-Barracuda team was the fastest man against the clock on Thursday’s Stage 5 of the Tour of California, winning the race’s only time trial around Bakersfield.

 
Zabriskie covered the 18.4-mile (29.7-kilometer) course in 35 minutes and 59 seconds, with an average speed of 30.7 miles per hour (49.5 kilometers per hour).


 

 

 

http://www.bicycling.com/garmin-insider/slideshows/zabriskie-s-time-trial-weaponry 

 

Zabriskie’s Time-Trial Weaponry

Garmin-Barracuda’s Dave Zabriskie used a commanding win on Stage 5 of the Amgen Tour of California to vault into the overall race lead. Here’s a look at the technology that helped get him across the line first. —Joe Lindsey
 
 
 
 
 
 
zabriskie p5 

Aero Stopping Power

Magura’s RT8 hydraulic rim brake caliper features arms that follow the shape of the fork to help aerodynamics. The hydraulic fluid line runs into the back of the caliper, keeping it “clean” in the air as well. And while many TT bikes suffer from substandard braking, the powerful hydraulic calipers offer impressive stopping power.
 
 
zabriskie p5

Lever Management

Magura makes dedicated brake levers for the system, but as you’ll notice, there’s no built-in system for Shimano’s Di2 shifters. At the Giro d’Italia, Garmin mechanics cobbled a custom solution for Ryder Hesjedal, but in California mechanics haven’t had time for that retrofit yet.
 
 

Power Stash

The cover you see here sits just above the chainstays and hides an integrated cubby for a Shimano Di2 battery. There’s dedicated cable management inside the bike as well, to make it easier to set up.
 
 

UCI-Legal

Cervélo uses a clever interpretation of the International Cycling Union’s rules on tube gussets to sculpt a seat tube–top tube juncture that would normally be an illegal shape. Anything to make the bike faster.
 
 

Cooling Tactic

Garmin’s Castelli skinsuits have a special pouch in the center of the back. In WorldTour races where radio communication is allowed, it can hold the riders’ radio transmitters. But at races like the Tour of California time trial—held in 101-degree heat in Bakersfield—it’s handy for socks stuffed with crushed ice.
 
 

Captain America’s Lid

Garmin has a special non-production version of Giro’s TT helmets. This is Dave Zabriskie’s Captain America livery as he is the U.S. national time-trial champion. First used at the Tour de France team time trial last year, the helmets are far blunter than even the Advantage 2 time-trial helmets that most other Giro-sponsored teams wore. Garmin’s sports scientist, Robby Ketchell, says that the profile has better aerodynamics in windy conditions. One downside: zero ventilation.
 
 

Labor of Love of Speed

Time trial bikes require special care. Team mechanics spend hours tinkering with internal cable routing, machining custom mounts for everything from computers to batteries, and doing anything they can to make the bikes faster (like removing bottle cages used in course recon). Here, Garmin-Barracuda’s Alex Banyay goes over Zabriskie’s Cervélo P5 to ensure that everything is in perfect working order.

To Grasp a Billion Stars

9 Apr

Reposting another Phil Plait piece. This one is totally mindblowing.
 
http://mblogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/
 
 

 

To grasp a billion stars

There are times — rare, but they happen — when I have a difficult time describing the enormity of something. Something so big, so overwhelming, that words simply cannot suffice.

The basic story is: Using the VISTA telescope in Chile and the UKIRT telescope in Hawaii, astronomers have made an incredibly detailed map of the sky in infrared. This map will help understand our own galaxy, more distant galaxies, quasars, nebulae, and much more.

But what do I mean by “incredibly detailed”?

This is where words get hard. So hang on tight; let me show you instead.

Here’s a section of the survey they made, showing the star-forming region G305, an enormous cloud of gas about 12,000 light years away which is busily birthing tens of thousands of stars:

[Click to enstellarnate.]

Pretty, isn’t it? There are about 10,000 stars in this image, and you can see the gas and dust that’s forming new stars even as you look.

But it’s the scale of this image that’s so amazing. It’s only a tiny, tiny part of this new survey. How tiny? Well, it came from this image (the area of the first image is outlined in the white square):

Again, click to embiggen — it’ll blow your socks off. But we’re not done! That image is a subsection of this one:

… which itself is a subsection of this image:

Sure, I’ll admit that last one doesn’t look like much, squished down into a width of a few hundred pixels here for the blog. So go ahead, click on it. I dare you. If you do, you’ll get a roughly 20,000 x 2000 pixel picture of the sky, a mosaic made from thousands of individual images… and even that is grossly reduced from the original survey.

How big is the raw data from the survey? Why, it only has 150 billion pixels aiieeee aiieeeeee AIIEEEEE!!!

And this would be where I find myself lacking in adjectives. Titanic? Massive? Ginormous? These all fail utterly when trying to describe a one hundred fifty thousand megapixel picture of the sky.

Yegads.

And again, why worry over words when I can show you? The astronomers involved helpfully made the original data — all 150 billion pixels of it — into a pan-and-zoomable image where you can zoom in, and in, and in. It’s hypnotizing, like watching “Inception”, but made of stars.

And made of stars it is: there are over a billion stars in the original image! A billion. With a B. It’s one of the most comprehensive surveys of the sky ever made, and yet it still only scratches the surface. This survey only covers the part of the sky where the Milky Way galaxy itself is thickest — in the bottom image above you can see the edge-on disk of our galaxy plainly stretching across the entire shot — and that’s only a fraction of the entire sky.

Think on this: there are a billion stars in that image alone, but that’s less than 1% of the total number of stars in our galaxy! As deep and broad as this amazing picture is, it’s a tiny slice of our local Universe.

And once again, we’ve reached the point where I’m out of words. Our puny brains, evolved to count the number of our fingers and toes, to grasp only what’s within reach, to picture only what we can immediately see — balk at these images.

But… we took them. Human beings looked up and wondered, looked around and observed, looked out and discovered. In our quest to seek ever more knowledge, we built the tools needed to make these pictures: the telescopes, the detectors, the computers. And all along, the power behind that magnificent work was our squishy pink brains.

A billion stars in one shot, thanks to a fleshy mass of collected neurons weighing a kilogram or so. The Universe is amazing, but so are we.

Images credit: Mike Read (WFAU), UKIDSS/GPS and VVV

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